Redding Pit Disaster in Falkirk

25 September 2023
Redding Pit Diaster memorial

Today marks the centenary of the Redding Pit Disaster in Falkirk. This was one of the worst accidents in Scottish Mining History, where 40 men tragically lost their lives when the Redding Pit flooded and 66 miners were trapped underground.

An account of the disaster can be found here: Redding Pit Disaster – Falkirk Local History Society

The tragedy had a devastating effect on the small local community, with some families losing multiple relatives. Tales of bravery and heroism abounded from both the miners and the rescuers, and the community came together in solidarity, through their suffering.

At Bannockburn House, we are linked to the tragedy through James Mitchell a past owner of the house between 1910 – 1960.

He was the chairman of the James Nimmo and Co. Ltd, Coalmasters – the owners of the Redding Pit. James was known to have been deeply affected by the tragedy. At the annual business meeting of the Nimmo Company shareholders on 5 December 1923, after making an emotional reference to the pit disaster, James collapsed and died. He was 68 years old. James was survived by his widow Anne and daughter Annie. Annie (Miss Mitchell) continued to live in the house until 1960.

In Redding on Saturday 23 September, a ceremony was held to commemorate the centenary and to unveil a new enhanced memorial to the disaster, arranged by the Sir William Wallace Grand Lodge of Scotland Free Colliers to meet the pledge made that “They Shall Never Be Forgotten”.

We would like to take the opportunity to reflect with the community of Redding and remember the men whose lives were taken from them, and all of those who were affected by this disaster.

Redding pit diaster

Post by Dr Helen Young
Helen is a member of the History Team.

Catherine Bradley.<br />

More blog posts that you might be interested in reading

Spring is Sprung

Spring is Sprung

To be a successful gardener To be a successful gardener, it is important to be an optimist. You have to believe that every seed you plant will grow into the most stunningly beautiful cabbage or cornflower and when you plant spring bulbs, surely only an optimist would...

Apiary Blog March 2024

Apiary Blog March 2024

Like the rest of the garden, the apiary is coming to life after winter.  It has been warm enough during the day that the bees are no longer huddled in a cluster and instead are out foraging for pollen. The valuable early sources of pollen are giving way to the...

Chase away the Winter Blues!

Chase away the Winter Blues!

Peach Tree Greenhouse Week in, week out, the garden team can be found, working on the various areas of the surrounding garden. Often, we are digging or weeding, cutting back overgrown shrubs or decaying trees and sometimes we tackle a new section of the neglected...

Snowdrops

Snowdrops

February Fair Maids Snowdrops are not native to Britain but originate from mainland Europe and the common variety, Galanthus nivalis  (Galanthus -‘milkflower’, nivalis - ‘of the snow’) is believed to have been introduced around the beginning of the 16th century,...

A Happy New Year to all our Readers

A Happy New Year to all our Readers

A Happy New Year to all our Readers!   On the Bonfire It’s always a good feeling after the Christmas and New Year excess to get back out into the garden and begin a new growing season. January is a good time to clear out dead and diseased branches from...

Highlights of 2023

Highlights of 2023

Highlights of 2023 Now that we have reached the Winter Solstice, the turning point of the year, it is good to look back on the past twelve months from the comfort of a warm, cosy armchair. We had six weeks of drought in May and June, weeks of rain in February, August...

Tales of Autumn

Tales of Autumn

Tales of Autumn Drummond, our rescue cat has started to follow us about when we are working in different parts of the garden. Last week he actually followed us into the polytunnels for the first time.  Almost immediately, he began to run this way and that,...

Reflections from the Apiary

Reflections from the Apiary

Reflections from the ApiaryIt’s October and the end of the beekeeping year. The days are shortening, the wind picking up and, as far as the bees are concerned, the hatches have been battened down. The queen is curtailing her laying and the worker bees have...

Pumpkin Pie recipes and Modern Adaptations 17th and 18th Century

Pumpkin Pie recipes and Modern Adaptations 17th and 18th Century

1660- Robert May “Accomplisht Cook” "To make a Pumpion Pie." Take a pound of pumpion and slice it, a handful of thyme, a little rosemary, and sweet marjoram stripped off the stalks, chop them small, then take cinnamon, nutmeg, pepper, and a few cloves all beaten, also...

Reap what you sow

Reap what you sow

What a difference a month can make! Now that we are well into September, the Autumn weather is certainly in full flow. Leaves are starting to fall, swirling across the lawns as the breezes catch them, and windfall apples are being devoured by hungry wasps and clouds...

BOOK NOW